FIVE COMMON AROMATHERAPY MISTAKES

FIVE COMMON AROMATHERAPY MISTAKES

There aren’t that many hard and fast rules in the world of DIY aromatherapy, COMMON AROMATHERAPY MISTAKES.

There are some common-sense guidelines—don’t walk away from the stove when you’re melting beeswax, for example.

But by and large, no one’s standing over you like an Olympic ice skating judge who saw every mistake you made on that triple toe-loop.

Even so, when beginning any new venture, mistakes are likely to be made.

Familiarizing yourself ahead of time with some of the most common aromatherapy missteps can help you to avoid making them in the first (or at least second) place.

MISTAKE #1: USING UNDILUTED OILS

Aromatherapy oils are so concentrated that they can irritate the skin, cause photosensitivity reactions, or build up in the body and lead to a sensitization response.

Always dilute essential oils. If you get undiluted essential oils on your skin, wash them away with soap and water immediately.

MISTAKE #2: USING TOO MUCH ESSENTIAL OIL 

Some people want their products to have a strong scent, so they use more essential oils than a recipe calls for.

While this may make the end product more fragrant, it might also irritate the skin or nasal passages. It’s important to follow recipes exactly.

When you have gained experience and confidence with essential oils and are beginning to make your own recipes. The rule to follow is: Use no more than one drop of essential oil per teaspoon of carrier oil.

MISTAKE #3: USING POROUS MATERIALS FOR MIXING, MEASURING, AND POURING

Porous materials like plastic will absorb fragrance.


Once those aromas are there, they are there to stay, which can muddle the fragrances of future recipes made with the same objects.

If you use plastic stirrers, funnels, droppers, or pipettes, consider them single-use objects.

For mixing, use glass or metal bowls and stirring rods. And use metal funnels or dispose of plastic funnels after a single use.

MISTAKE #4: STORING IMPROPERLY (COMMON AROMATHERAPY MISTAKES)

Essential oils are volatile and break down over time.

Most manufacturers put them in dark glass jars, which keeps the light out and preserves the oils.

Still, in order to preserve the oils for as long as possible, store the bottles tightly sealed in a cool. Dry location away from a heat source or vibration, both of which can break down the volatile compounds more quickly.

MISTAKE #5: BUYING TOO MANY OILS

Getting started with essential oils is exciting and fun, so it’s easy to get carried away.

Don’t purchase the biggest starter kit you can find, because it may be difficult to use all of those oils before they go bad.

Instead, buy a few commonly used starter oils such as lavender, peppermint, and lemon, and then add a few more as needed.

Check the oils after about six months and again after a year to ensure they remain fresh, and discard those with an off scent.


Add Comment